What did Socrates say to corrupt the youth?

What did Socrates say to corrupt the youth?

Plato's (429-347 BCE) Socrates was accused of two things during his trial: impiety (asebeia) against Athens' gods by introducing new gods and corrupting Athenian youth by training them to question the status quo. He defended himself by arguing that he was only seeking to expose the weaknesses in his accusers' arguments.

In other words, he tried to explain away his actions by saying that they were not really wrong because nobody was hurt by them. This shows that he believed that all souls are immortal and therefore incapable of dying. He also believed that the only way for people to be happy is if they know what happiness is and pursue it.

Socrates taught in the streets of Athens, mainly at the Academy but also elsewhere when he was forced to leave the Academy because he could not pay his rent. Therefore, he exposed many problems within the city-state of Athens including its military policy, which was not doing well at all. People got angry with him for questioning the government officials who arrested him repeatedly and tried to force him to commit suicide. But he never did despite many attempts on his part.

At his trial, he argued that the only true good is knowledge and that everything else is just a matter of opinion. So he wanted everyone to think for themselves instead of following others blindly.

What are the two main ways that Socrates refutes the charge that he corrupts the youth?

Socrates faced two sets of allegations in his trial: I asebeia (impiety) against the pantheon of Athens by introducing new gods; and (ii) corrupting of Athenian youth by training them to question the status quo. In response, he presented two types of arguments to refute these charges: elenctic arguments, which seek to prove that the current state of affairs is not correct or acceptable; and apodeictic arguments, which aim to show that such things must be so.

In both types of argument, Socrates uses examples from daily life to make his point clear to the jury. For example, when accused of impiety, he used the myths told about the origins of Athens' major institutions to show that they were not concerned with initiating any new gods but only with preserving what already existed. In addition, he argued that if the city's leaders really wanted to know what was best for Athens, they would ask those who knew rather than trying to figure it out themselves. Finally, he pointed out that even if he did introduce new gods, this would not be a crime because everyone does it. Indeed, even the priests of the pantheon had been doing it for years without anyone complaining before him.

As another example, when accused of corrupting the youth, Socrates used three different methods to refute this allegation. First, he asked questions about what was considered right and wrong, good and bad behavior.

What were the official charges against Socrates?

Socrates' trial (399 BC) was convened to decide his guilt on two charges: asebeia (impiety) against the pantheon of Athens and corrupting of the city-young; state's the accusers claimed two impious deeds by Socrates: "failing to accept the gods that the city acknowledges" and "introducing new... doctrines about the gods."

He was found guilty and sentenced to death for harming the honor of the state by refusing to sacrifice to Athena Nike on Keanos island near Athens. He was executed by drinking hemlock poison.

After Socrates' death, his friends held a funeral ceremony for him and erected a monument to his memory. This act was considered as sacrilege at the time because Socrates had no tomb of his own. So, they buried him outside the city limits in a place called the Sacred Grove of Athens.

His ideas still live on today. The Athenian government didn't stop him from being judged by his peers each time they wanted to kill his idea, but it did prevent his burial inside the city limits. His family moved his remains after the 17th century BC.

Some historians believe that Socrates' trial was staged by the city of Athens to prevent him from influencing other cities through philosophy. Others say that he was actually guilty of both charges and that the trial was just a political game played by Athens during its period of decline when they needed to keep their influence over other cities.

When was Socrates accused?

399 B.C. Socrates' trial (399 BC) was convened to decide his guilt on two charges: asebeia (impiety) against the pantheon of Athens and corrupting of the city-young; state's the accusers claimed two impious deeds by Socrates: "failing to accept the gods that the city acknowledges" and "introducing new... doctrines about the gods."

Socrates was found guilty and sentenced to death. His execution was scheduled for the evening but he managed to talk his judges into changing his sentence to suicide. He drank hemlock and died.

Here lies a man who knew that he knew nothing, who refused to admit it, and so paid the price.

His ideas will continue to live on.

About Article Author

Carrie Simon

Carrie Simon has been an educator for over 10 years. She loves helping people discover their passions and helping them take steps towards fulfilling those passions. Carrie also enjoys coaching sports with kids in her free time.

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